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Technology


Design and Technology: Vision Statement

Design and Technology is a valuable, enriching subject within today’s modern world and provides challenge and deep knowledge for all. It enables students to be successful by drawing upon knowledge learned across the curriculum so they can actively contribute to the creativity, culture, diversity, wealth and wellbeing of themselves, their community and the world in which they live.

Design and Technology: Design Rationale

Our curriculum is focussed on two main areas: Design and Technology and Food and Nutrition. Our big ideas of sustainability; material science; health and wellbeing; and provenance flow through each key stage.

In Design and Technology, students are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. We look to draw upon the work of others throughout history, providing opportunities for them to critically reflect upon, evaluate and develop their designs.

In Food and Nutrition, students will develop their knowledge and understanding of food nutrition and health; food science; food safety; food choice and provenance. Along with this they will strengthen preparation skills and have a good understanding of hygiene, cooking techniques, and sensory characteristics.

There will be opportunities to draw upon and use their knowledge and skills from a wide range of other disciplines from across the school to give their learning purpose and relevance and enable thorough reflection of their work.

Big Ideas

The design and technology 'big ideas' encompass everything we deliver as part of our curriculum provision. Each is so important to students being successful in design and technology and support the whole school ethos of 'success with care'. The four big ideas are: Health and Well-being; Sustainability; Material Science; Provenance.

Big Ideas

Key Concepts

Working closely with the whole school 3 Rs, the faculty wanted to recognise and develop other key characteristics that a successful design and technology student should possess. We believe that through our varied and rich curriculum provision students should experience and explore these 6 Rs.

Key Concepts


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Facilities

The facilities provided within the faculty play an important part in encouraging our students to achieve in terms of making all possible opportunities accessible. Most rooms are used for specific material areas.

  • Food Preparation and Nutrition: E14, E15 and E22
  • Design and Technology - Textiles: E20, E23
  • Engineering: E17
  • Design and Technology – Resistant Materials: E18, E19, E21a, E21b
  • Product Design: E19
  • ICT Resources can be found in three areas in the faculty: E16, E20 and E25

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Key Stage 3

At Key Stage 3 our students are offered a wide variety of opportunities to access the design and technology national curriculum. Exciting and innovative, context driven schemes of work have been created to develop our student's abilities and creativity, providing sound skills and real world experiences ready for transition to Key Stage 4.

From Year 7 to Year 9, students access Design and Technology through specific material areas on a rotational basis for nine weeks each material area. The lessons are delivered in a double period format, with Year 7 having an additional single period lesson each week.

Students will also experience three Design and Technology Plus (DT+) modules within each year at KS3. Each module is just 3 weeks in length and offers students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to a real-world problem or scenario.

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  • Year 7

    DT

    Context: The rate of greenhouse gases and carbon produced during the manufacture of predominantly plastic products is increasing.

    • How can the use of plastics be reduced?

    Students are given the task to assist a local toy manufacturer by designing and manufacturing an interactive toy which uses renewable resources and reduces plastic waste.

    Students consider what makes a good designer, exploring different ways of solving problems. Students design solutions and go onto manufacture their own individual design using the tools, equipment and machinery available in our extensive design and technology department. Students also develop their DT materials knowledge in the specialist areas: metals, timbers, plastics, electronics through focused theory lessons.

    DT Textiles

    Context: When designing a textiles product, it can be challenging to avoid design fixation.

    • Can you look to the work of others to inspire your designing and making whilst considering sustainability?

    As an introduction to textiles technology students are introduced to the textiles workshop and its health and safety, learning how to use tools and equipment safely whilst developing their dextrous skills. At its design core students work to understand the context of a range of different design movements within our cultural history and use this knowledge to develop their design ideas. Students undertake a practical make that allows them a explore sustainability using a range of techniques and processes to explore their creativity.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    Context:

    • Can you use the Eatwell Guide and a basic knowledge of nutrition and ingredients to help achieve a healthy balanced diet?

    As part of their work with food, pupils will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    DT+

    The DT+ modules in Design and Technology include 3-week modules that introduce important aspects that underpin other areas of the subject. In these modules' students have the opportunity to design and make using software, tools, equipment and machinery. Developing their awareness, abilities and appreciation for the designed world. In Y7 our DT+ is broken down into three projects;

    TinkerCAD

    Students are introduced to the world of TinkerCAD. They develop their understanding of the programme using the online lesson tutorials and then move onto the project context.

    Context: Landing on the lunar surface is very difficult because of the Moon’s lack of atmosphere; friction cannot be used to reduce speed and parachutes are of no use for the same reason. Very careful deceleration of the engines is required, landing gently on the rocky surface, avoiding possible destruction of the module or disturbing layers of dust that could affect instruments.

    • Imagine you are aerospace engineers. You must design and build a simple lander to protect two ‘astronauts’ when they land. The lander must be able to carry a ‘cabin’ containing the ‘astronauts’ and land upright when dropped without damage to the lander or loss of astronauts.

    E-Textiles

    Students are introduced to the developing world of E-Textiles where electronics are incorporated into sportswear that can measure, track and feedback information to assist the wearer. They are introduced to basic electronics and build a simple circuit that can be embedded into a rucksack through the project context.

    Context: E-textiles is emerging as an asset in technical clothing.

    • Can you sample a basic circuit that can be incorporated into a rucksack?

    Chocolate mould

    Students learn about the vacuum forming process, food packaging design & the promotion of chocolate through this exciting project. They learn about plastics, moulding and forming, before creating their own shape and packaging. The project culminates with students making their chocolate design for them to eat.

    Context: Food manufacturers must make important decisions about how they package food products to sell to make them not only appealing and informative but also sustainable and suitable for use.

    • Can you design and make a new packaging in order to showcase a new range of chocolate?
  • Year 8

    Food

    A range of food products are made to develop making skills, use of equipment, safety and hygiene, food knowledge and nutritional understanding. The social context of food is also explored.

    • Breakfast
    • Burgers
    • Kebabs
    • Goujons

    Textiles

    Students learn about tie dye and block printing and are encouraged to be creative in these techniques. Students go on to develop their embroidery skills before learning how to insert a zipper and constructing a pencil case using the sewing machine.

    Designing

    Students learn about presenting their design work to a high standard. This will include rendering and various techniques for drawing in 3D. They will then use these skills to present their own piece of work. Students will be able to use the skills gained from this unit in all areas of technology.

    ICT Skills

    Students are put into the role of a designer within a design team in this 'Dragon's Den' style project. They will research iconic design and designers before being employed by a fictitious company to design a new or improved product. It encourages students to really think like a designer and work as part of a team. Through this project, students will also use a wide range if ICT skills to carry out research, design, model and present their ideas for their final presentation.

    AMP

    Music Player Amplifier: Students construct a mono amplifier for the textiles project later on in the year. Students learn how a PCB is constructed and simple electronic components such as a capacitor, resistor, and speakers to more complicated components such as an operational amplifier.

    Robot

    Students learn how to use Edison - a small programmable robot that is compatible with Lego – to develop their knowledge of robotics. Students learn how bio-mimicry is used in robotics and about the purpose of robots in the real world.

    Chocolate Moulds

    Students will learn about different types of plastics and their role in different products. They will learn about and use vacuum forming to make the mould for their luxury chocolate. Students will also look at how products can be marketed for sale, including looking at clever advertisements and how products are packaged. Using their knowledge, they will create a suitable package for their chocolate.


    Double period lessons

    Resistant Materials 1

    Students learn how to design and make a predominantly metal structure for the home / garden.They will investigate what makes a strong structure and look at different types of structure and where they are used. Students learn the importance of planning and testing a before manufacture and use modelling to test their product. They then plan the final product to size and work out how much material they will need to make the product within a given time scale before manufacturing their product to a high standard.

    Resistant Materials 2

    Students use a program called 'Circuit Wizard' to design and make a circuit that can control a programmable microcontroller. The microcontroller can be programmed to light LEDs and play a tune. The students then design and make a package for their project. Students learn about more complicated PCB manufacture, how a micro controller works and about more complicated integrated circuits. They also learn how to package an electronic product.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques [for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    In Year 8, the content includes:

    • Week 1: Dem: Edible casings. Eatwell Guide.
    • Week 2: Practical: Edible casings. Sensory work.
    • Week 3: Experiment: Special diets.
    • Week 4: Practical: Salad. Nutritional focus.
    • Week 5: Practical: Muffins. Function of eggs, sensory work.
    • Week 6: Fibre / Sensory Analysis.
    • Week 7: Practical: Pizza. High fibre, reducing fat.
    • Week 8: Practical: Cottage pie. Food spoilage.
    • Week 9: Practical: Quiche. Function of ingredients.
    • Week 10: Practical: Fish cakes. Food provenance.
    • Week 11: Practical: Layered dessert. Gelatinisation.
    • Week 12: Practical: Sausage casserole. Salt.

    Textiles

    Students will continue developing their skills with both hand and machine sewing to design and make a docking station casing for the amp made in their electronics skills lesson. It will require students to really think about how they will turn their idea into a complex 3D product.

  • Year 9

    Double period lessons

    Textiles

    Building on their knowledge and experience from year 7 and 8, students will learn about quilted products. Through designing, modelling and testing, students will produce a quilted stocking of a professional quality.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    In Year 9, the content includes:

    • Week 1: Introduction - Eatwell Guide. Love food Hate Waste.
    • Week 2: Practical: Spicy Rice. Fats.
    • Week 3: Practical: Lasagne. Diet related diseases (fats).
    • Week 4: Practical: Cheesecake. Calcium.
    • Week 5: Practical: Profiteroles. Functions of Ingredients.
    • Week 6: Practical: Tortellini al ragu. Nutrition Focus.
    • Week 7: Dem: Perfect Pies. Protein and Provenance.
    • Week 8: Practical: Perfect Pies. Evaluation.
    • Week 9: Practical: Enriched dough. Festival Foods.
    • Week 10: Practical: Sweet and sour. Multicultural food. Sauces.
    • Week 11: Practical: Smörgåstårta. Advanced Knife Skills.
    • Week 12: Practical: Swiss Roll Roulade. The function of eggs.

    Resistant Materials

    Product Design: Linked with the flat pack furniture project, students will learn how designers use inspiration from a variety of sources to influence their designs. They will research different design eras and designers before using their findings to influence their own designs. Being responsible and resilient learners, students will be iterative in their approach to design and will need to trial and test a number of ideas before reaching their final design. After using CAD to show their final product, students will move onto the flat pack furniture unit to manufacture their design.

    Furniture Project: Using a single sheet of material, students will need to be economical in their use of resources to manufacture their previously designed product. Students will use the skills they have developed over Key Stage 3 to manufacture their product to a high standard using both hand tools and machines.

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Key Stage 4

Key Stage 4 for our students begins in Year 10. Each set getting two periods a week. We offer a variety of GCSE courses in order to cater for the individual learning needs of our students.

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  • Year 10 Year 11

    Design & Technology AQA (8552) Timbers / Textiles

    This new GCSE will run as two courses. Students will be allowed to study their material of choice either Timbers or Textiles. All students will be required to study the core technical principles below.

    The new GCSE places greater emphasis on understanding and applying iterative design processes. Students will use their creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others' needs, wants and values.

    Our GCSE allows students to study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth.

    Core technical principles

    In order to make effective design choices students will need a breadth of core technical knowledge and understanding that consists of:

    • new and emerging technologies
    • energy generation and storage
    • developments in new materials
    • systems approach to designing
    • mechanical devices
    • materials and their working properties

    All of this section must be taught and all will be assessed.

    Specialist technical principles

    In addition to the core technical principles, all students should develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the following specialist technical principles:

    • selection of materials or components
    • forces and stresses
    • ecological and social footprint
    • sources and origins
    • using and working with materials
    • stock forms, types and sizes
    • scales of production
    • specialist techniques and processes
    • surface treatments and finishes

    Each specialist technical principle should be delivered through at least one material category or system. Not all of the principles outlined above relate to every material category or system, but all must be taught. The categories through which the principles can be delivered are:

    • papers and boards
    • timber based materials
    • metal based materials
    • polymers
    • textile based materials
    • electronic and mechanical systems

    Designing and making principles

    They will need to demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of designing and making principles in relation to the following areas:

    • investigation, primary and secondary data
    • environmental, social and economic challenge
    • the work of others
    • design strategies
    • communication of design ideas
    • prototype development
    • selection of materials and components
    • tolerances
    • material management
    • specialist tools and equipment
    • specialist techniques and processes

    Examination

    What's assessed

    • Core technical principles
    • Specialist technical principles
    • Designing and making principles

    How it's assessed

    • Written exam: 2 hours
    • 100 marks
    • 50% of GCSE

    Questions

    • Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks): A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.
    • Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks): Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.
    • Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks): A mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

    Non Examined Assessment

    Practical application of:

    • Core technical principles
    • Specialist technical principles
    • Designing and making principles
    • 30–35 hours approx
    • 100 marks
    • 50% of GCSE

    The NEA is a substantial design and make task

    Assessment criteria:

    • Identifying and investigating design possibilities
    • Producing a design brief and specification
    • Generating design ideas
    • Developing design ideas
    • Realising design ideas
    • Analysing & evaluating
    • In the spirit of the iterative design process, the above should be awarded holistically where they take place and not in a linear manner
    • Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA
    • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence
    • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by AQA

    Engineering (AQA 8852)

    The sky's the limit. Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags. Our new GCSE introduces students to a host of new technologies, helping them to gain practical skills and understanding to inspire a lifelong interest in engineering. It will particularly appeal to those who enjoy being creative, with an affinity for drawing, design, maths and problem-solving.

    Whilst this is a new qualification, you’ll see we've kept much of the popular content and topics that we know you like. We've also maintained the clear structure to our assessment using a mixture of question styles, giving all your students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.

    Core content

    1. Engineering materials
    2. Engineering manufacturing processes
    3. Systems
    4. Testing and investigation
    5. The impact of modern technologies
    6. Practical engineering skills

    Assessments

    Question paper: Externally assessed

    What's assessed

    Sections 1–6 from the subject content.

    Though the 'Practical engineering skills' section will predominantly be assessed through the NEA, some questions in the written exam will relate to practical contexts and students will need to apply their understanding within these contexts.

    How it's assessed

    • Written exam: 2 hours
    • 120 marks
    • 60% of GCSE

    Questions

    • Multiple choice questions assessing breadth of knowledge
    • Short answer questions assessing in depth knowledge, including calculations
    • Multiple choice questions related to the application of practical engineering skills
    • Extended response questions drawing together elements of the specification

    Non-exam assessment: Practical engineering

    What's assessed

    • Application of skills, knowledge and understanding in a practical context
    • Analysis and evaluation of evidence

    How it's assessed

    • A brief set by AQA released on 1 June in the first year of study.
    • 80 marks
    • 40% of GCSE

    Questions - Students produce:

    • engineering drawings or schematics to communicate a solution to the brief
    • an engineering product that solves a problem

    Food Preparation & Nutrition (AQA 8585)

    Our GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition develops the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.

    The majority of the course is delivered through preparation and making activities. Students are able to make the connections between theory and practice to apply their understanding of food and nutrition to practical preparation.

    The topics covered are:

    1. Food, nutrition and health
    2. Food science
    3. Food safety
    4. Food choice
    5. Food provenance

    Examination (1 hour 45 mins): Paper 1: Food preparation and nutrition

    • Multiple choice questions (20 marks)
    • Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

    What's assessed:

    Theoretical knowledge of food preparation and nutrition from:

    • Food, nutrition and health
    • Food science
    • Food safety
    • Food choice
    • Food provenance

    This is worth 50% of the GCSE

    Non-exam assessment (controlled assessment)

    What's assessed:

    • Task 1: Food investigation: Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.
      Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task.
    • Task 2: Food preparation assessment: Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.
      Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

    How it's assessed

    • Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.
    • Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

    This is worth 50% of the GCSE

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Key Stage 5

At Key Stage 5 the faculty offers three courses. Each teaching group has five single periods of lessons per week.

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  • Year 12 Year 13

    A Level: Fashion and Textiles (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of fashion and textiles
    • develop the capacity to design and make fashion products
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing, developing their confidence to succeed in a number of careers, especially those in the creative industries

    How will I be assessed?

    • AO1: Identify, investigate and outline design possibilities to address needs and wants
    • AO2: Design and make prototypes that are fit for purpose
    • AO3: Analyse and evaluate: Design decisions and outcomes, including for prototypes made by themselves and others wider issues in design and technology
    • AO4: Demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of: Technical principles; Designing and making principles

    Assessment weightings

    Assessment objectives Paper 1 Paper 2 NEA Overall
    AO1     15% 15%
    AO2     25% 25%
    AO3 7.5% 7.5% 10% 25%
    AO4 17.5% 17.5%   35%
    Overall weighting of components 25% 25% 50% 100%

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Fashion Designer / Buyer, Costume Designer, Pattern Drafter, Retail and Marketing.


    A Level: Product Design (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of design and technology
    • develop a real understanding of what it means to be a designer
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing

    How will I be assessed?

    Candidates study and work with a variety of materials and components used in the design and making of everyday products. They work in both two and three dimensional forms. Candidates gain an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of design and manufacture:

    • Paper 1 (25%) will examine students on their knowledge of core technical principles of materials and their application, designing and making
    • Paper 2 (25%) will examine specialist subject knowledge through product analysis and understanding of commercial manufacture

    The non-exam assessment (NEA) (50%) will allow students to apply their knowledge through practical application. Using the core principles of designing and making, they will identify a need, research, design and make a product to satisfy a real problem.

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Product designer; design engineer; architecture; CAD draughts person; automotive design, graphic designer, manufacturing and engineering; biomedical engineer


    Level 3 Diploma: Food Science and Nutrition (WJEC)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The Level 3 Food Science and Nutrition qualifications allow students to gain a wealth of knowledge about the food and nutrition industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the relationship between the human body and food as well as practical skills for cooking and preparing food.

    How is the course delivered?

    The WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition is made up of four units:

    • Unit 1: Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups (mandatory) – 1.5hr examination and a controlled assessment assignment in Year 12
      This mandatory unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the science of food safety, nutrition and nutritional needs in a wide range of contexts, and through on–going practical sessions, to gain practical skills to produce quality food items to meet the needs of individuals. The purpose of this unit is for students to develop an understanding of the nutritional needs of specific target groups and plan and cook complex dishes to meet their nutritional needs.
    • Unit 2: Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat (mandatory) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The second mandatory unit will allow students to develop their understanding of the science of food safety and hygiene; essential knowledge for anyone involved in food production or wishing to work in the food industry. Practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience. Students will develop an understanding of hazards and risks in relation to the storage, preparation and cooking of food in different environments and the control measures needed to minimise these risks. From this understanding, students will be able to recommend the control measures that need to be in place, in different environments, to ensure that food is safe to eat.
    • Unit 3: Experimenting to Solve Food Production Problems (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The aim of this unit is for students to use their understanding of the properties of food in order to plan and carry out experiments. The results of the experiments would be used to propose options to solve food production problems.
    • Unit 4: Current Issues in Food Science and Nutrition (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      Through this unit, you will develop the skills needed to plan, carry out and present a research project on current issues linked to issues related to food science and nutrition. This could be from the perspective of a consumer, food manufacturer, caterer and/or policy-making perspective.

    All learners must take units 1 and 2 and then select either unit 3 or unit 4.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Together with relevant Level 3 qualifications such as AS and A Levels in Biology, Chemistry, Sociology and Maths, learners will gain the required knowledge to progress to higher education degree courses, such as:

    • BSc Food and Nutrition
    • BSc Human Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Public Health Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Food Science and Technology

    An understanding of food and nutrition is relevant to many industries and job roles. Care providers and nutritionists in hospitals use this knowledge, as do sports coaches and fitness instructors. Hotels and restaurants, food manufacturers and government agencies also use this understanding to develop menus, food products and policies that that support healthy eating initiatives. Food and drink is the largest manufacturing sector in the UK.

    Many employment opportunities within the field of food and nutrition are available to graduates including:

    Food Technology, Food Marketing, Food Product Development, Dietetics, Nutrition, Teaching, Catering, Nursing, Hotel Management, Environmental Health, Social Health, Sports science

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Teaching staff

The Technology faculty benefits from creative and innovative staff. Many have a subject specialism to help drive ambition within our students.

  • Birch, Debbie (Design and Technology: Timbers)
  • Davies, Joanne (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Wilders, Faye (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Griffith, Vincent (Engineering)
  • Shaw, Richard (Engineering)
  • Swindell, Rachel (Design and Technology: Timbers / Textiles; Product Design; Fashion and Textiles)
  • Tattersall, Jane (Assistant Curriculum Leader - Design and Technology: Textiles; Fashion and Textiles)
  • Thompson, Stuart (Head of the Technology Faculty - Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Walshaw, Clare (Assistant Curriculum Leader - Engineering; Product Design)

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Support staff

The role of the faculty support staff is vital in that they support the learning and teaching activities within the faculty ensuring all our students' needs are met. All technicians bring valuable skills to the faculty that help our students achieve their potential.

Our teaching assistants play an important role in supporting the range of educational needs presented by out students by differentiating the Design and Technology.

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