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TechnologyIn design and technology students combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products and systems that meet human needs. They learn to use current technologies and consider the impact of future technological developments. They learn to think creatively and intervene to improve the quality of life, solving problems as individuals and members of a team.


Aims of the Technology Faculty

The Technology Faculty has a distinctive contribution to make to the aims of the national curriculum. The design and technology programme of study provides opportunities to plan sequences of work, learning outcomes and teaching approaches that develop:

  • Successful learners
  • Confident individuals
  • Responsible citizens

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Facilities

The facilities provided within the faculty play an important part in encouraging our students to achieve in terms of making all possible opportunities accessible. Most rooms are used for specific material areas.

  • Food Technology: E14, E15 and E22
  • Textiles Technology: E20, T1
  • Electronics, Control and Design: E17
  • Resistant Materials: E18, E19, E21a, E21b, E23
  • Graphics, Design: E19
  • Sixth Form Learning Centre: E24

ICT Resources can be found in three areas in the faculty; E16, E21 and E20.

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Key Stage 3

At Key Stage 3 our students are offered a wide variety of opportunities to access the design and technology national curriculum. Exciting and innovative schemes of work have been created to develop our student's abilities and creativity, providing sound skills and experiences ready for transition to Key Stage 4.

From Year 7 to Year 8, students access Technology through specific material areas on a rotational basis (seven or nine weeks). The lessons are delivered in a double period format.

At Year 7 and 8, students also attend single period "skills" lessons. Here they are offered the opportunity to further build and develop skills through a range of focused design and make tasks. The "skills" lessons rotate every five weeks. Through the Year 8 skills lessons, the faculty develops students understanding of the importance of sustainability.

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  • Year 7

    Single period lessons

    Food and Nutrition

    A range of food products are made to develop making skills, use of equipment, safety and hygiene, food knowledge and nutritional understanding.

    • Fruit Salad
    • Speedy Pizza
    • Tortilla Wraps
    • Scones

    Textiles

    Students will develop their understanding and skill when using the sewing machine to produce their own Apron. The project also incorporates T-shirt vinyl printing as well as screen printing so that students learn and experience a small aspect of these industrial techniques.

    ICT Skills

    Students use an introductory level 3D CAD software package called TinkerCAD. They learn the basic tools needed to import and manipulate a number of items to produce a key fob to be 3D printed along with designing their own product using the skills they have developed.

    Plastics CAD/CAM

    Students Learn how CAD/CAM can be used to produce an acrylic picture frame. Students design the shape on 2D design, transfer this to a laser cutter which cuts out the required shape ready to be assembled. Students will also have the opportunity to make a 3D printed key fob.

    Pneumatics

    Students make a simple pneumatic rocket. They learn about different pneumatic components such as single and double acting cylinders, push button and roller actuators, reciprocating and single acting circuits.

    Pencil Boxes

    Students make a wooden pencil box from hardwood, softwood and manufactured boards. They will develop their use of hand tools and become confident when using machinery in the workshop.

    Metal

    Students will learn how to use and be confident with the basic metal working tools and equipment to produce a candle holder.


    Double period lessons

    Resistant Materials 1

    Students will use the knowledge they have learnt in their skills lessons to design and make their own pinball game. They will investigate levers and motion to help them understand how their product will work. Students will develop their use of hand tools and machines to make their game as well as incorporating some computing skills too.

    Resistant Materials 2

    Students will develop their knowledge of simple electronic systems through the making of a polymer nightlight aimed at a young child. They will learn how to make a printed circuit board and about the functions of some basic electronic components. Students will then learn how to solder their components in place to make a functioning circuit. The casing will be designed using CAD and manufactured on the laser cutter to produce a quality product.

    Textiles

    Students will design and make a cushion cover using decorative techniques to apply their chosen design. They will build their confidence with using the sewing machines as well as learning how to use a variety of hand sewing techniques to manufacture their product to a high standard.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    In Year 7, the content includes:

    • Week 1: Introduction to the food room. Hygiene and safety.
    • Week 2: Practical: Cheesy Potato Pie. Staple Foods.
    • Week 3: Practical: Stir Fry. Eatwell Plate.
    • Week 4: Nutrition Introduction. Plan to make a new rock cake.
    • Week 5: Practical: Rock Cake. Sensory Evaluation.
    • Week 6: Obesity. Reading Nutritional Labels.
    • Week 7: Practical: Pasta Bake. Nutrients Knowledge.
    • Week 8: Practical: Bolognese. Meat.
    • Week 9: Practical: Fruit Crumble. Seasonality.
    • Week 10: Practical: Curry in a Hurry. Salt, Herbs and Spices.
    • Week 11: Practical: Vegetable Cake. Vegetables.
    • Week 12: Practical: Smoothies. Sugar.
  • Year 8

    Single period lessons

    Food

    A range of food products are made to develop making skills, use of equipment, safety and hygiene, food knowledge and nutritional understanding. The social context of food is also explored.

    • Breakfast
    • Burgers
    • Kebabs
    • Goujons

    Textiles

    Students learn about tie dye and block printing and are encouraged to be creative in these techniques. Students go on to develop their embroidery skills before learning how to insert a zipper and constructing a pencil case using the sewing machine.

    Designing

    Students learn about presenting their design work to a high standard. This will include rendering and various techniques for drawing in 3D. They will then use these skills to present their own piece of work. Students will be able to use the skills gained from this unit in all areas of technology.

    ICT Skills

    Students are put into the role of a designer within a design team in this 'Dragon's Den' style project. They will research iconic design and designers before being employed by a fictitious company to design a new or improved product. It encourages students to really think like a designer and work as part of a team. Through this project, students will also use a wide range if ICT skills to carry out research, design, model and present their ideas for their final presentation.

    AMP

    Music Player Amplifier: Students construct a mono amplifier for the textiles project later on in the year. Students learn how a PCB is constructed and simple electronic components such as a capacitor, resistor, and speakers to more complicated components such as an operational amplifier.

    Robot

    Students learn how to use Edison - a small programmable robot that is compatible with Lego – to develop their knowledge of robotics. Students learn how bio-mimicry is used in robotics and about the purpose of robots in the real world.

    Chocolate Moulds

    Students will learn about different types of plastics and their role in different products. They will learn about and use vacuum forming to make the mould for their luxury chocolate. Students will also look at how products can be marketed for sale, including looking at clever advertisements and how products are packaged. Using their knowledge, they will create a suitable package for their chocolate.


    Double period lessons

    Resistant Materials 1

    Students learn how to design and make a predominantly metal structure for the home / garden.They will investigate what makes a strong structure and look at different types of structure and where they are used. Students learn the importance of planning and testing a before manufacture and use modelling to test their product. They then plan the final product to size and work out how much material they will need to make the product within a given time scale before manufacturing their product to a high standard.

    Resistant Materials 2

    Students use a program called 'Circuit Wizard' to design and make a circuit that can control a programmable microcontroller. The microcontroller can be programmed to light LEDs and play a tune. The students then design and make a package for their project. Students learn about more complicated PCB manufacture, how a micro controller works and about more complicated integrated circuits. They also learn how to package an electronic product.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques [for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    In Year 8, the content includes:

    • Week 1: Dem: Edible casings. Eatwell Guide.
    • Week 2: Practical: Edible casings. Sensory work.
    • Week 3: Experiment: Special diets.
    • Week 4: Practical: Salad. Nutritional focus.
    • Week 5: Practical: Muffins. Function of eggs, sensory work.
    • Week 6: Fibre / Sensory Analysis.
    • Week 7: Practical: Pizza. High fibre, reducing fat.
    • Week 8: Practical: Cottage pie. Food spoilage.
    • Week 9: Practical: Quiche. Function of ingredients.
    • Week 10: Practical: Fish cakes. Food provenance.
    • Week 11: Practical: Layered dessert. Gelatinisation.
    • Week 12: Practical: Sausage casserole. Salt.

    Textiles

    Students will continue developing their skills with both hand and machine sewing to design and make a docking station casing for the amp made in their electronics skills lesson. It will require students to really think about how they will turn their idea into a complex 3D product.

  • Year 9

    Double period lessons

    Textiles

    Building on their knowledge and experience from year 7 and 8, students will learn about quilted products. Through designing, modelling and testing, students will produce a quilted stocking of a professional quality.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    In Year 9, the content includes:

    • Week 1: Introduction - Eatwell Guide. Love food Hate Waste.
    • Week 2: Practical: Spicy Rice. Fats.
    • Week 3: Practical: Lasagne. Diet related diseases (fats).
    • Week 4: Practical: Cheesecake. Calcium.
    • Week 5: Practical: Profiteroles. Functions of Ingredients.
    • Week 6: Practical: Tortellini al ragu. Nutrition Focus.
    • Week 7: Dem: Perfect Pies. Protein and Provenance.
    • Week 8: Practical: Perfect Pies. Evaluation.
    • Week 9: Practical: Enriched dough. Festival Foods.
    • Week 10: Practical: Sweet and sour. Multicultural food. Sauces.
    • Week 11: Practical: Smörgåstårta. Advanced Knife Skills.
    • Week 12: Practical: Swiss Roll Roulade. The function of eggs.

    Resistant Materials

    Product Design: Linked with the flat pack furniture project, students will learn how designers use inspiration from a variety of sources to influence their designs. They will research different design eras and designers before using their findings to influence their own designs. Being responsible and resilient learners, students will be iterative in their approach to design and will need to trial and test a number of ideas before reaching their final design. After using CAD to show their final product, students will move onto the flat pack furniture unit to manufacture their design.

    Furniture Project: Using a single sheet of material, students will need to be economical in their use of resources to manufacture their previously designed product. Students will use the skills they have developed over Key Stage 3 to manufacture their product to a high standard using both hand tools and machines.

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Key Stage 4

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  • Year 10 Year 11

    Electronic Products (Edexcel)

    • Unit 1: Creative Design and Make Activities: This is controlled assessment worth 60% of the final GCSE grade.
    • Unit 2: Knowledge and Understanding of Electronic Products: This unit is assessed by a final exam worth 40% of the final GCSE grade.

    Learning takes place through making a series of small 'design and make' exercises. This will enable students to explore a wide range of components and concepts.

    • Playing tunes using a 555 astable
    • Number displays using 4026
    • Mono amplifier to use with your Mp3 player
    • Computer simulating
    • Soldering and manufacturing our own PCBs

    Year 11 is dedicated to controlled assessment work, and is spent entirely on the production of a major project which is responsible for 60% of the final grade. This can be a fun section where students will have a wide choice of what they wish to design and make. The other 40% will be gained from an examination taken at the end of Year 11.

    Example controlled assessment task:

    • Mp3 players
    • Guitar amps
    • Metronome
    • Safe
    • Simon says game
    • Number generators

    Food Technology (OCR)

    We have developed a wide range of activities, not only to prepare students to succeed and reach their potential for the GCSE course, but also to develop a sound understanding of food preparation and nutrition to help maintain a healthy lifestyle. There are 2 pieces of controlled assessment worth 60% and 1 end of course exam worth 40%. High practical content is offered throughout the course.

    Year 10:

    • Controlled assessment - Promoting Healthy lifestyles = 30% of the overall GCSE
    • Preservation and extending shelf life
    • Diet and nutrition
    • The design process
    • Structure of food
    • Functions of ingredients
    • Processes and skills

    Year 11:

    • Controlled assessment – Making Quality Products = 30% of the overall GCSE
    • Sustainable design
    • Product analysis
    • Industrial production
    • Food Technology examination = 40% of the overall GCSE

    Product Design (OCR)

    There are four assessed units, running throughout Year 10 and Year 11. OCR Product Design GCSE offers a huge range of benefits for our students. It provides the exciting opportunity to work with any materials giving you greater choice and making it more enjoyable for you to study.

    • Unit A551: Developing & Applying Design Skills: a controlled assessment which is worth 30% of your grade. It is focussed on using your imagination to design & model an innovative product of your choice.
    • Unit A552: The Designing and Making Innovation Challenge: the Innovation Challenge is a new and exciting type of assessment, focusing on your imagination, innovation and flair for designing and making. It requires you to make quick decisions, take risks, be adventurous and use input from others, through controlled and structured peer evaluation. It is a practical exam and is worth 20% of your grade.
    • Unit A553: Making, Testing & Marketing Products: a controlled assessment where you make a professionally manufactured prototype of a chosen item. This is then marketed in an innovative way.
    • Unit A554: Designing Influences: a written exam and is worth 20% of your grade. It tests your knowledge and understanding of the factors that influence designing, iconic products, trendsetters, design eras and design movements.

    Resistant Materials (Edexcel)

    GCSE RMT covers a wide range of activities based on designing and making products that are manufactured using materials such as wood, metal and plastics in many forms. As well as learning hand skills, you will use a range of industrials processes to shape and form materials into functioning products. Over the course of two years you will develop a whole range of creative designing and making skills, technical knowledge and understanding relating to RMT and invaluable transferable skills such as problem solving and time management.

    • Unit 1: Creative Design and Make Activities: This is controlled assessment worth 60% of the final GCSE grade. Students design and make one product. They will develop skills in researching, designing, reviewing, planning, making and testing and evaluating.
      • This unit is internally assessed under controlled conditions.
      • Students must complete a design and make activity.
      • All work, with the exception of research and preparation, must be done under informal supervision.
      • Research and preparation may be completed under limited supervision.
      • Students need to complete their designing and making within 40 hours of informal supervision.
      • There are eight assessment criteria for designing, and five assessment criteria for making.
      • There are a total of 50 marks available for the designing and 50 marks available for the making.
    • Unit 2: Knowledge and Understanding of Resistant Materials: This unit is assessed by a final exam worth 40% of the final GCSE grade. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in design and technology. They will learn about industrial and commercial practices and the importance of quality checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times.
      • This unit is assessed through a 1-hour and 30-minute examination paper set and marked by Edexcel.
      • The examination paper will be a question and answer booklet and all questions are compulsory.
      • The examination paper will consist of multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-writing questions.
      • The total number of marks available is 80.

    Textiles Technology (Edexcel)

    Textiles are the most creative fun subject in Technology with consistently high results. It is aimed at those students who have an interest in Fashion Design, Crafts and who enjoy investigating textiles, thinking creatively, problem solving, designing products of the future, making products, using/ wearing and testing ideas and products.

    The GCSE Textile Technology course is based around a practical approach that encourages students to design and make quality textile products with creativity and flair using a wide range of materials, components and technologies.

    The GCSE covers a wide range of topics including sports fashion, natural forms, morphing products, child's play and sustainability. Over the three years of the course, students develop a whole range of creative designing and making skills, technical knowledge and understanding relating to textile products and invaluable transferable skills such as problem solving and time management.

    • Unit 1: Creative Design and Make Activities: This is controlled assessment worth 60% of the final GCSE grade. You will have the option of completing your coursework unit in two different ways. Through a combined design and make activity where you design a product then make a model of it.
    • Unit 2: Knowledge and understanding of Textiles Technology: This unit is assessed by a final exam worth 40% of the final GCSE grade. The examination will be based on a structured exam paper which your teacher will be able to guide you through. Everything that you need to learn for this unit is set out in the specification so your teacher will know exactly how to prepare you for the exam.

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Key Stage 5

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  • Year 12 Year 13

    At Key Stage 5 the faculty offers three courses. Each teaching group has five single periods of lessons per week.

    A Level: Fashion and Textiles (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of fashion and textiles
    • develop the capacity to design and make fashion products
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing, developing their confidence to succeed in a number of careers, especially those in the creative industries

    How will I be assessed?

    • AO1: Identify, investigate and outline design possibilities to address needs and wants
    • AO2: Design and make prototypes that are fit for purpose
    • AO3: Analyse and evaluate: Design decisions and outcomes, including for prototypes made by themselves and others wider issues in design and technology
    • AO4: Demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of: Technical principles; Designing and making principles

    Assessment weightings

    Assessment objectives Paper 1 Paper 2 NEA Overall
    AO1     15% 15%
    AO2     25% 25%
    AO3 7.5% 7.5% 10% 25%
    AO4 17.5% 17.5%   35%
    Overall weighting of components 25% 25% 50% 100%

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Fashion Designer / Buyer, Costume Designer, Pattern Drafter, Retail and Marketing.


    A Level: Product Design (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of design and technology
    • develop a real understanding of what it means to be a designer
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing

    How will I be assessed?

    Candidates study and work with a variety of materials and components used in the design and making of everyday products. They work in both two and three dimensional forms. Candidates gain an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of design and manufacture:

    • Paper 1 (25%) will examine students on their knowledge of core technical principles of materials and their application, designing and making
    • Paper 2 (25%) will examine specialist subject knowledge through product analysis and understanding of commercial manufacture

    The non-exam assessment (NEA) (50%) will allow students to apply their knowledge through practical application. Using the core principles of designing and making, they will identify a need, research, design and make a product to satisfy a real problem.

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Product designer; design engineer; architecture; CAD draughts person; automotive design, graphic designer, manufacturing and engineering; biomedical engineer


    Level 3 Diploma: Food Science and Nutrition (WJEC)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The Level 3 Food Science and Nutrition qualifications allow students to gain a wealth of knowledge about the food and nutrition industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the relationship between the human body and food as well as practical skills for cooking and preparing food.

    How is the course delivered?

    The WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition is made up of four units:

    • Unit 1: Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups (mandatory) – 1.5hr examination and a controlled assessment assignment in Year 12
      This mandatory unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the science of food safety, nutrition and nutritional needs in a wide range of contexts, and through on–going practical sessions, to gain practical skills to produce quality food items to meet the needs of individuals. The purpose of this unit is for students to develop an understanding of the nutritional needs of specific target groups and plan and cook complex dishes to meet their nutritional needs.
    • Unit 2: Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat (mandatory) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The second mandatory unit will allow students to develop their understanding of the science of food safety and hygiene; essential knowledge for anyone involved in food production or wishing to work in the food industry. Practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience. Students will develop an understanding of hazards and risks in relation to the storage, preparation and cooking of food in different environments and the control measures needed to minimise these risks. From this understanding, students will be able to recommend the control measures that need to be in place, in different environments, to ensure that food is safe to eat.
    • Unit 3: Experimenting to Solve Food Production Problems (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The aim of this unit is for students to use their understanding of the properties of food in order to plan and carry out experiments. The results of the experiments would be used to propose options to solve food production problems.
    • Unit 4: Current Issues in Food Science and Nutrition (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      Through this unit, you will develop the skills needed to plan, carry out and present a research project on current issues linked to issues related to food science and nutrition. This could be from the perspective of a consumer, food manufacturer, caterer and/or policy-making perspective.

    All learners must take units 1 and 2 and then select either unit 3 or unit 4.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Together with relevant Level 3 qualifications such as AS and A Levels in Biology, Chemistry, Sociology and Maths, learners will gain the required knowledge to progress to higher education degree courses, such as:

    • BSc Food and Nutrition
    • BSc Human Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Public Health Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Food Science and Technology

    An understanding of food and nutrition is relevant to many industries and job roles. Care providers and nutritionists in hospitals use this knowledge, as do sports coaches and fitness instructors. Hotels and restaurants, food manufacturers and government agencies also use this understanding to develop menus, food products and policies that that support healthy eating initiatives. Food and drink is the largest manufacturing sector in the UK.

    Many employment opportunities within the field of food and nutrition are available to graduates including:

    Food Technology, Food Marketing, Food Product Development, Dietetics, Nutrition, Teaching, Catering, Nursing, Hotel Management, Environmental Health, Social Health, Sports science

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Teaching staff

The Technology faculty benefits from creative and innovative staff. Many have a subject specialism to help drive ambition within our students.

  • Amens, Sally (Technology Teacher - Resistant Materials; Product Design)
  • Birch, Debbie (Technology Teacher - Textiles Technology)
  • Davies, Joanne (Food Technology)
  • Kerruish, Faye (Technology Teacher - Food Technology)
  • Lloyd, Alexander (Technology Primary Liaison Coordinator - Resistant Materials)
  • Shaw, Richard (Technology Teacher - Electronic Products; Resistant Materials)
  • Swindell, Rachel (Duke of Edinburgh Coordinator - Textiles Technology)
  • Tattersall, Jane (Technology Gifted and Talented Coordinator - Textiles Technology)
  • Thompson, Stuart (Head of the Technology Faculty - Food Technology)
  • Walshaw, Clare (Technology Teacher - Graphics and Product Design; Resistant Materials; Product Design)

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Support staff

The role of the faculty support staff is vital in that they support the learning and teaching activities within the faculty ensuring all our students' needs are met. All technicians bring valuable skills to the faculty that help our students achieve their potential.

Our teaching assistants play an important role in supporting the range of educational needs presented by out students by differentiating the Design and Technology.

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